“Draw a fat werewolf.”

I got up this morning and looked over some notes I’d written late last night.  I actually did a lot of writing after supper yesterday: a new poem, a scribble outline for the first half of this month’s “Hopelessly Lost …”, some bits for the new shape of the novel I’m calling Kite Mountain.  But mixed in with the more understandable stuff was this cryptic instruction:

“Draw a fat werewolf.” 

So I drew a fat werewolf.  It was a lot of fun.  So I encourage all of you– pull out your sketchbook or a hunk of scrap paper, grab a pen or a pencil or a brush, and draw yourself a fat werewolf.

June 5th –It’s Draw a Fat Werewolf Day.

Sharkipede

 

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Published in: on June 6, 2008 at 1:04 am  Leave a Comment  
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A profound question.

In the course of preparing for the Secret Project, I am revisiting, and very occasionally revising, some of my older cartoon stories.  (ooh!  Hint, hint!)

 In the pages I am currently working on, I find myself, once again, contemplating an original character who is is supposed to remind the reader of that classic pop culture gorilla, Donkey Kong. I am drawing him based on screenshots I’ve gotten off the internet through Google Image Search.

Mr. Shark, who played way too many video games back in the late 70s/early 80s, insists that DK has a belly button, shaped like an X. I, who played almost no video games back in the quarter a pop era (preferring to save up my spare change for bargain matinees and paperback science fiction novels), can find no sign of said navel in my reference screen shots. DK seems to me to have pretty buff pecs, but no other torso details.

So help me out, gang! Does Donkey Kong have a belly button?  Bonus points for useful reference links.

Sharkipede

Published in: on March 14, 2008 at 2:34 am  Comments (4)  
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It’s all about owls!

Today’s post is all about owls.  Specifically, owls in Indiana.  And owls in comics.  And owls in Indiana in comics …

I have written an owl into Kekionga #2 . Admittedly, it’s sort of at the last minute, but I haven’t pencilled any of the pages in which the owl now appears, except the back cover, where he or she should be quite easy to add.  I know, it’s dumb to still be fiddling with the script while actually pencilling the comic, but I say if the owl makes for a better story then I’m going with the owl.

Which leaves me nosing through bird books and trolling Google Images trying to figure out what kind of owl this owl might be.  I’ve narrowed it down to a Great Horned Owl,  an Eastern Screech Owl,  or a Barn Owl.  All three are common in this part of the country, and I’ve seen all three wild within 200 miles of Kekionga’s (imaginary) location, so I think any one can be justified.  Now I’m trying to figure out which owl is the right owl.

In case you are not an owl maven, here is a Great Horned Owl

http://wwwstatic.kern.org/images/calmzoo/greathornedowl001.jpg

An Eastern Screech

http://h1.ripway.com/Scouts463/Birds/screech-owl-1.jpg

and a Barn Owl

http://www.message-wildlife-art.co.uk/Images/Bird%20Pics/Barn%20Owl%20Large.jpg

The Great Horned Owl is the owliest owl,  perhaps even the default owl.  It’s the owl people think of when they hear the word.  As such, it is probably too obvious.

The Screech Owl is also very owly looking, but much smaller. I think it is big enough to do everything I need it to do in the story, though.

Then there is the Barn Owl.  I really like Barn Owls because they are so strange looking– they look like ghosts, or moths, and fly so silently. 

Using a Barn Owl would give my story a spooky, ethereal quality, while the other two owls are more woodsy, wild, and basically normal.  The Screech or Horned Owls will support the themes of the story, the Barn Owl would provide a counterpoint.

So, which owl? Anyone wanting to offer an opinion on the matter is welcome to post, or email the usual address.

Thanks for owling with me today.

Sharkipede

Published in: on January 15, 2008 at 11:45 pm  Comments (3)  
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snakes and bats. also, work.

One of the better things that have happened recently is the return of the Letterman and Craig Ferguson shows to late night TV.  Letterman’s World Wide Pants production company, which makes both shows, made a separate deal with the writer’s union, so I do not have to  feel like a scab for watching.

And on Craig, last Friday, was the actor Dominic Monaghan (Lost, Lord of the Rings).  Now, normally this would not be considered of general interest– celebrities go on late night talk shows, film at 11, blah blah blah.

But Mr. Monaghan brought in animals, and one of them was a lovely snake I’d never seen before– he said it was a rat snake called a Blue Beauty, and it came from Thailand, and it eats bats.

Seriously.  This snake climbs the rocks outside bat caves and nabs the flying mice as they enter or exit.  I’m assuming this is true– a little research seems to bear it out– and even if it wasn’t I would want it to be.  I want there to be snakes that eat bats.

Here are some images I found of Blue Beauty rat snakes.  Even if you don’t usually click on the links, I recommend you check these out.  The name is fully accurate– this long, lean, active serpent has gorgeous blue and grey patterns that change as they move down its body. It is one spectacular looking snake. 

http://www.bluegorgon.com/framedtail.png

http://www.bluegorgon.com/framedfullmatsu.png

http://art1.sheezyart.com/image/44/447860.jpg

 Also, the Australian carpet python– which is also quite a nice snake, but not as interesting.  But it eats bats, too!  Yay!

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/0b/Australian-Carpet-Python.jpg/555px-Australian-Carpet-Python.jpg

This got me thinking.  What eats bats?

Snakes, obviously. Birds of prey, especially owls.  Dogs, and presumably raccoons, cats and other hunters , will eat a bat that’s “down”, and will certainly try to catch a bat in flight.  (I’ve never seen a dog manage this feat, but I’ve seen Chester get a bird on the wing, so I suppose it’s possible.) 

But I was not expecting the answer “frogs”. http://www.bbc.co.uk/nature/animals/features/281feature1.shtml

This is good.  I want frogs that eat bats.  I want bats that eat frogs. (Which also happens.)

For those who are not interested in nature, or late night TV, I offer an update on Kekionga #2.   The new title block may be fixed in stone– I’m still waffling.  The back cover is designed, though I still don’t have a front cover that works.  Everything is thumbnailed except the opening sequence, and I am thinking of going ahead with pencils, starting with about page 5.

I’ve never done this before, but this project is already such a mess as regards process, I wonder how else I can mess it up???

I’m sure I’ll figure something out.

Sharkipede

Published in: on January 8, 2008 at 11:41 pm  Comments (2)  
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